IF&HR participates in the consultation for a new CEDAW General Recommendation on trafficking in women and girls

This week, the Institute for Feminism & Human Rights submitted a written comment on the proposed United Nations CEDAW General Recommendation on trafficking in women and girls in the context of global migration. The General Recommendation, which is to be concluded in 2020, is to provide guidance to State Parties on how to ensure full compliance with their obligations to respect, protect and fulfil women’s human right in the context of global migration.

Link to the CEDAW Committee consultation webpage: https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/CEDAW/Pages/GRTrafficking.aspx

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IFHR case study for the Disrupt Demand project published

This Disrupt Demand paper is based on stakeholder interviews and on a roundtable held in Stockholm in March 2018 hosted by the Swedish National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and the Institute for Feminism and Human Rights on the cooperation between NGOs and Police in campaigns leading to legal change and during the implementation of laws targeting the demand for human trafficking for sexual exploitation. The IFHR Disrupt Demand case study is available here.

The Disrupt Demand project successfully concluded

The Institute for Feminism and Human Rights has been a partner in the Disrupt Demand project for the past two years.

The Disrupt Demand project, which is funded by the European Commission, was initiated by six NGOs from across Europe seeking to identify and promote best practices to prevent and combat human trafficking for sexual exploitation. The NGO group includes research organizations and frontline service providers, who assist victims of human trafficking.

Disrupt Demand is designed to supportefforts to prevent human trafficking for sexual exploitation by reducing demand. To achieve this aim, we apply a combination of legal strategy research, and fostering cooperation among key stakeholders. 

Disrupt Demand recognizes the harm inherent to the international trade in human beings for the purpose of prostitution, fueled by the demand for sexual services. By reducing demand, we can prevent women, girls, boys and men from entering into the prostitution trade.

Project Partners
Immigrant Council of Ireland, IRELAND
Institute for Feminism and Human Rights, SWEDEN
Klaipeda Social and Psychological Services Center, LITHUANIA
Mediterranean Institute of Gender Studies, CYPRUS
Mouvement du Nid, FRANCE
Exit – pois prostituutiosta ry / Prostitution Association, FINLAND

More information about the project is available on the project website here.

The Disrupt Demand project comparative report can be downloaded.

 

 

Disrupt Demand seminar: ‘Collaboration between law enforcement and NGO’s to prevent and discourage demand: practical aspects’

       

The Institute for Feminism and Human Rights and the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings hosted a one-day working seminar focusing on prostitution and trafficking in human beings in Stockholm on Monday 5 March.

The aim of the seminar was to allow the participants to discuss good practices in NGO and law enforcement collaboration to progress and implement legislative reforms in the context of demand reduction.

Representatives of law enforcement and NGO’s from Ireland and Sweden presented case studies documenting good practice in police and prosecution services collaboration with front line service providers on human trafficking investigations. The case studies promoted mutual learning and exchange between two countries that have and are building experience in a legal context where the demand for sexual services is criminalized. 

Representatives of Swedish NGO’s and frontline service providers for victims of prostitution and trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes were present to share their experiences. This included representatives from the Swedish Salvation Army and Talita. Representatives of NGO’s active in advocacy for legislative change from France, Finland, Cyprus, Ireland and Lithuania also participated in the seminar.

About the Disrupt Demand project
The Disrupt Demand project, which is funded by the European Commission, was initiated by six NGOs from across Europe seeking to identify and promote best practices to prevent and combat human trafficking for sexual exploitation. The NGO group includes research organizations and frontline service providers, who assist victims of human trafficking.

Disrupt Demand is designed to supportefforts to prevent human trafficking for sexual exploitation by reducing demand. To achieve this aim, we apply a combination of legal strategy research, and fostering cooperation among key stakeholders. 

Disrupt Demand recognizes the harm inherent to the international trade in human beings for the purpose of prostitution, fueled by the demand for sexual services. By reducing demand, we can prevent women, girls, boys and men from entering into the prostitution trade.

Project Partners
Immigrant Council of Ireland, IRELAND
Institute for Feminism and Human Rights, SWEDEN
Klaipeda Social and Psychological Services Center, LITHUANIA
Mediterranean Institute of Gender Studies, CYPRUS
Mouvement du Nid, FRANCE
Exit – pois prostituutiosta ry / Prostitution Association, FINLAND

Good News from Scotland!

We are absolutely delighted that the Scottish National Party Conference today passed a resolution that” supports the development of a Scottish model of legislation that (1) decriminalises the sale of sex, (2) criminalises the purchase of sex and (3) offers appropriate support for those wishing to exit commercial sexual exploitation.”

Recent article in Le Monde Diplomatique: “On the Streets or in a House?”

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The article, “On the Streets or in a House? Sweden criminalised the purchase of sex; Germany preferred to legalise brothels,” in which our chairperson, Gunilla S. Ekberg is quoted, was published in French in Le Monde Diplomatique in December 2016, and on 12 January 2017 in English.

The PDF is available here.

Dutch newspaper: “The Swedish Prostitution Model Conquers the World’

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On 3 September 2016, a Dutch newspaper published a long-read article about the Swedish approach to prostitution and trafficking in human beings for sexual purposes, with a focus on the demand, and with references to other countries that have followed suit: “Swedish Prostitution Model Conquers the World”. The chairperson of IFHR, Gunilla S. Ekberg, was interviewed for the article.

The author of the article states that: “Buying sexual services becomes increasingly difficult. In Sweden the buyer is punished. This is an approach that is followed by many countries,” and goes on to criticize the approach taken in the Netherlands: “Administratively, the idea of voluntary prostitution has always been surrounded with doubt. Soliciting is addressed, but the underground sex business has never disappeared.” The article can be accessed online here. A PDF is available here